Sidama mother and child project, Ethiopia

Ethiopia

In Ethiopia, where diseases such as kala azar are endemic, we continue to fill healthcare gaps, and respond to emergencies and the needs of the growing refugee population.

By 31 October 2020, Ethiopia was hosting more than 796,400 registered refugees and asylum seekers, according to UNHCR, the UN refugee agency. Most of them are from South Sudan, Somalia, Eritrea and Sudan. In addition, intercommunal violence has led to an internal displacement crisis, which at times has affected more than one million people.

We provide medical and mental healthcare to refugees, internally displaced people and their host communities, communities affected and displaced by natural disasters such as floods and droughts, as well as to Ethiopians deported from Gulf countries and returned from Lebanon.

Our activities in Ethiopia include treating malnourished children and people with neglected diseases such as kala azar, running mobile clinics for communities in remote locations and donating drugs and medical supplies.

In 2019
Midwife Story
I see a lot of suffering in the refugee camp, but as a midwife I also see a lot of joy. MSF midwife Christine Tasnier
Ethiopia

A name full of hope

 
Ethiopian Refugees Crossing: Hamdayet Entry Point
Ethiopia

Providing assistance to people in Ethiopia and Sudan in wake of Tigray violence

Project Update 12 Jan 2021
 
MSF | Amhara Region
Ethiopia

“They saw soldiers and civilians coming in, wounded or dead”

Project Update 18 Dec 2020
 
Ethiopian Refugees Crossing - Hamadayet Border
Sudan

MSF providing medical care and assistance in Sudan to people fleeing violence in Ethiopia

Project Update 27 Nov 2020
 
TVT
Ethiopia

Displacement and humanitarian response in Ethiopia: challenges and dilemmas in complex crises

Report 3 Oct 2019
 
Ethiopia: The constant cycle of displacement
Ethiopia

The constant cycle of displacement

Project Update 12 Jul 2019
 
MSF Mobile Clinics and Tea Teams Somali Region
Ethiopia

Bringing healthcare to places where no health posts exist

Project Update 27 May 2019